1. (Source: vintageanchorbooks, via npr)

  2. fastcompany:

Ulysses Is More Fun To Read As A Game
If you’ve ever read—or, more likely, tried and failed to read—James Joyce's Ulysses, you’re familiar with the sense that the swirling mass of words is deliberately taunting you with its obscurity. Ulysses can be a fun, funny book, but even the most diehard fans would acknowledge that it’s also supremely frustrating. It’s a book that always forces you to think about reading. And so goes Ariel Malka's new app, which plays on the act of reading without really being a reading app.
Read More>

    fastcompany:

    Ulysses Is More Fun To Read As A Game

    If you’ve ever read—or, more likely, tried and failed to read—James Joyce's Ulysses, you’re familiar with the sense that the swirling mass of words is deliberately taunting you with its obscurity. Ulysses can be a fun, funny book, but even the most diehard fans would acknowledge that it’s also supremely frustrating. It’s a book that always forces you to think about reading. And so goes Ariel Malka's new app, which plays on the act of reading without really being a reading app.

    Read More>

  3. fastcodesign:

    Gorgeous Floating Columns Look Like Architectural Phantoms

    It takes several thousand years for layers and layers of plant waste to compress into a rich, black coal deposit. Undisturbed, that coal will only grow stronger within the Earth. Given enough time and pressure, it could, theoretically, perfect itself into a diamond.

    It’s a point to keep in mind when viewing the work of Seon-Ghi Bahk, a Korean artist known for creating intricate sculptures by suspending pieces of charcoal from nylon wires. His latest project, An Aggregation, is a collection of half-rotted columns. They explore the relationship between nature and civilization—the biological world, and the order that mankind attempts to ascribe to it.

    See More>

  4. For years, the gifts that children have been encouraged to buy for their fathers have emphasized the dad as a man apart. They are symbols of an adult world that children don’t quite understand—work clothes, alcohol, shaving paraphernalia, cordless drills—representing places that take men away from home, where they can be alone.
    Ian Crouch on the history of Father’s Day gifts: http://nyr.kr/1l1I0lF (via newyorker)

    (Source: newyorker.com, via newyorker)

  5. theatlantic:

How Funny-Looking Benedict Cumberbatch Conquered Hollywood

The French have an expression called jolie laide—directly translated, it means “beautiful ugly,” but as a concept it embodies the intersection between attractiveness and unconventionality that makes us relish imperfection. Jolie laide is Sarah Jessica Parker and Benicio del Toro and Jessica Paré. It’s why Solange is visually more intriguing than Beyoncé, and why Meat Loaf, however improbably, was a sex symbol for much of the 1980s.
Sofia Coppola is often cited as the female embodiment of jolie laide, but as it relates to men, there’s no more obvious example in contemporary culture than Benedict Cumberbatch. In bleached-blonde, Botox-browed Hollywood, he’s the antithesis of everything we’re supposed to find attractive.
Read more. [Image: AP]

    theatlantic:

    How Funny-Looking Benedict Cumberbatch Conquered Hollywood

    The French have an expression called jolie laide—directly translated, it means “beautiful ugly,” but as a concept it embodies the intersection between attractiveness and unconventionality that makes us relish imperfection. Jolie laide is Sarah Jessica Parker and Benicio del Toro and Jessica Paré. It’s why Solange is visually more intriguing than Beyoncé, and why Meat Loaf, however improbably, was a sex symbol for much of the 1980s.

    Sofia Coppola is often cited as the female embodiment of jolie laide, but as it relates to men, there’s no more obvious example in contemporary culture than Benedict Cumberbatch. In bleached-blonde, Botox-browed Hollywood, he’s the antithesis of everything we’re supposed to find attractive.

    Read more. [Image: AP]

  6. If, indeed, we all have a kind of appetite for eternity, we have allowed ourselves to be caught up in a society that frustrates our longing at every turn…Never were people more harried by time.
    Sheldon Vanauken, A Severe Mercy (via emberlinsmiscellany)
  7. sesamestreet:

    Sesame Street and our friends around the globe are ready for the World Cup — it’s Copa Sésamo!

  8. fastcompany:

What Makes Old Books Smell Like Old Books?
One of the most unique and little-noted features of the dead-tree reading platform is its smell. A crisp new edition of Pride and Prejudice is scented a whole lot differently than the musty, middle-aged printing still being read in many a high school English class today.
But what causes these smells? A UK chemist and teacher who runs the blog Compound Interest, an exploration of everyday chemical compounds, went to investigate and came up with an infographic to explain the matter.
Read More>

    fastcompany:

    What Makes Old Books Smell Like Old Books?

    One of the most unique and little-noted features of the dead-tree reading platform is its smell. A crisp new edition of Pride and Prejudice is scented a whole lot differently than the musty, middle-aged printing still being read in many a high school English class today.

    But what causes these smells? A UK chemist and teacher who runs the blog Compound Interest, an exploration of everyday chemical compounds, went to investigate and came up with an infographic to explain the matter.

    Read More>

  9. fastcodesign:

    The Ugly Power Cord Gets A Sculptural Makeover

    There’s a limit to what you can do with that ugly tangle of power cords and adapters in the corner. Or is there? Los Angeles-based design studio Okum, headed up by designer David Okum, has reconceived the cord-tangle and the result is a rather pretty, playful sculpture otherwise known as the Oon powercord.

    Read More>

  10. Travel is like adultery: one is always tempted to be unfaithful to one’s own country. To have imagination is inevitably to be dissatisfied with where you live. There is in men, as Peter Quennell said, “a centrifugal tendency.” In our wanderlust, we are lovers looking for consummation.
    Anatole Broyard (1910–1990), U.S. journalist, reviewer. “Being There,” Bread Loaf Anthology of Contemporary American Essays, eds. Robert Pack and Jay Parini, University Press of New England (1989).