1. (Source: Spotify)

  2. Afraid to let your secrets out
    Everything that you hide
    Can come crashing through the door now
    But too scared to face all your fear
    So you hide but you find
    That the shame won’t disappear

    Sparks will fly as grace collides
    With the dark inside of us
    So please don’t fight
    This coming light
    Let this blood come cover us

    This is where the healing begins
    When you come to where you’re broken within
    The light meets the dark

    (Source: Spotify)

  3. (Source: Spotify)

  4. (Source: Spotify)

  5. Is it fair to say I was lured away?
    By endless distractions and lovelier attractions then
    Or fairer still, my own free will
    Is the better one to blame
    For this familiar mess I’ve made again

    So I would understand, if you were out of patience
    And I would understand, if I was out of chances

    Your mercies are new every morning
    So let me wake with the dawn
    When the music is through or so it seems to be
    Let me sing a new song, old things gone
    Every day it’s true, You make all Your mercies new

    The distance left between East and West
    Is how far You would go to forget the debt I owe
    And thrown into the sea, the wicked ways in me
    Will never have a chance to wash back on the sand

    So I would understand, if you would make me pay
    I would understand, lying in the bed I made again

    (Source: Spotify)

  6. (Source: vintageanchorbooks, via npr)

  7. fastcompany:

Ulysses Is More Fun To Read As A Game
If you’ve ever read—or, more likely, tried and failed to read—James Joyce's Ulysses, you’re familiar with the sense that the swirling mass of words is deliberately taunting you with its obscurity. Ulysses can be a fun, funny book, but even the most diehard fans would acknowledge that it’s also supremely frustrating. It’s a book that always forces you to think about reading. And so goes Ariel Malka's new app, which plays on the act of reading without really being a reading app.
Read More>

    fastcompany:

    Ulysses Is More Fun To Read As A Game

    If you’ve ever read—or, more likely, tried and failed to read—James Joyce's Ulysses, you’re familiar with the sense that the swirling mass of words is deliberately taunting you with its obscurity. Ulysses can be a fun, funny book, but even the most diehard fans would acknowledge that it’s also supremely frustrating. It’s a book that always forces you to think about reading. And so goes Ariel Malka's new app, which plays on the act of reading without really being a reading app.

    Read More>

  8. fastcodesign:

    Gorgeous Floating Columns Look Like Architectural Phantoms

    It takes several thousand years for layers and layers of plant waste to compress into a rich, black coal deposit. Undisturbed, that coal will only grow stronger within the Earth. Given enough time and pressure, it could, theoretically, perfect itself into a diamond.

    It’s a point to keep in mind when viewing the work of Seon-Ghi Bahk, a Korean artist known for creating intricate sculptures by suspending pieces of charcoal from nylon wires. His latest project, An Aggregation, is a collection of half-rotted columns. They explore the relationship between nature and civilization—the biological world, and the order that mankind attempts to ascribe to it.

    See More>

  9. For years, the gifts that children have been encouraged to buy for their fathers have emphasized the dad as a man apart. They are symbols of an adult world that children don’t quite understand—work clothes, alcohol, shaving paraphernalia, cordless drills—representing places that take men away from home, where they can be alone.
    Ian Crouch on the history of Father’s Day gifts: http://nyr.kr/1l1I0lF (via newyorker)

    (Source: newyorker.com, via newyorker)

  10. theatlantic:

How Funny-Looking Benedict Cumberbatch Conquered Hollywood

The French have an expression called jolie laide—directly translated, it means “beautiful ugly,” but as a concept it embodies the intersection between attractiveness and unconventionality that makes us relish imperfection. Jolie laide is Sarah Jessica Parker and Benicio del Toro and Jessica Paré. It’s why Solange is visually more intriguing than Beyoncé, and why Meat Loaf, however improbably, was a sex symbol for much of the 1980s.
Sofia Coppola is often cited as the female embodiment of jolie laide, but as it relates to men, there’s no more obvious example in contemporary culture than Benedict Cumberbatch. In bleached-blonde, Botox-browed Hollywood, he’s the antithesis of everything we’re supposed to find attractive.
Read more. [Image: AP]

    theatlantic:

    How Funny-Looking Benedict Cumberbatch Conquered Hollywood

    The French have an expression called jolie laide—directly translated, it means “beautiful ugly,” but as a concept it embodies the intersection between attractiveness and unconventionality that makes us relish imperfection. Jolie laide is Sarah Jessica Parker and Benicio del Toro and Jessica Paré. It’s why Solange is visually more intriguing than Beyoncé, and why Meat Loaf, however improbably, was a sex symbol for much of the 1980s.

    Sofia Coppola is often cited as the female embodiment of jolie laide, but as it relates to men, there’s no more obvious example in contemporary culture than Benedict Cumberbatch. In bleached-blonde, Botox-browed Hollywood, he’s the antithesis of everything we’re supposed to find attractive.

    Read more. [Image: AP]